Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.3: L. Stephen Velasquez

For our sixth season of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our third issue of 2021, edited by Krishnendu Ray, and featuring articles and creative pieces which collectively address the issue of “gastropolitics,” as described in that issue’s editorial letter.

Join Editorial Collective member Paula Johnson in conversation with her Smithsonian colleague Stephen Velasquez, author of the recently published “Stirring the Pot: Calendario de Comida 1976, Chicano Art as Food Activism.” Paula and Steve discuss how the Calendario, created by California-based artist collectives in 1975, sought to bring attention to alternative foodways and indigenous food knowledges as part of a broader social justice movement, as well as the broader role of Chicano activists in reimagining colonial histories and identity.

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.3: Sucharita Kanjilal

For our sixth season of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our third issue of 2021, edited by Krishnendu Ray, and featuring articles and creative pieces which collectively address the issue of “gastropolitics,” as described in that issue’s editorial letter.

For this episode, Krishnendu is joined by Sucharita Kanjilal to discuss her recently published article, “Beyond Bourdieu: What Tomatoes in Indian Recipes Tell Us about ‘Taste’,” which explores how this now staple ingredient became incorporated into Indian pantries in the 20th century. Weaving together the histories of two British imports – the tomato and the recipe – she discusses the fluidity of taste-making in postcolonial India.

Image courtesy of the author.

Winter 2021, Volume 21 Number 4

Editorial Letter | Daniel E. Bender and Signe Rousseau

IMMOBILITY AND FRICTIONS

Uncontrolled Movements: An Overview of Abdicated Control in Florida’s Prison Food Spaces | John Daimoku Kingham

Challenging Power, Fighting for Food: A Gastronomica Call for Submissions on Food and Activism | Josée Johnston, Koby Song-Nichols, and Michael Chrobok

Adirondack Mountain Oysters | Luke McNally

Why I Am Mad about the Ducks | Amy B. Trubek

ON THE MOVE

“Swiggy it!”: Food Delivery, Gastro Geographies, and the Shifting Meaning of the Local in Pandemic India | Tulasi Srinivas

Playing with Our Food | Cheryl Cheung

Classical Dishes, Taste, and Violence | Joel Rodrigues

ACROSS THE LINES

Sake Journal (Goshu no nikki): Japan’s Oldest Guide to Brewing | Eric C. Rath

Toward “Translating the Foods of the World”: A Gastronomica Call for Submissions | Eric C. Rath

An Education of the Senses at the University of California, Berkeley: Alice Waters from Then to Now | Cari Borja

50 Years On, Did Alice Waters Change Food Forever? | The Gastronomica Editorial Collective

Tipping the Scales | David Szanto

Ferment | Monica Rico

Sacrament | Monica Rico

Food Activism and Language in a Slow Food Italy Restaurant Menu | Carole Counihan

What to Read Now: An Interview with Kim Walker and Mark Nesbitt, authors of Just the Tonic: A Natural History of Tonic Water | Jaclyn Rohel

REVIEWS

Farmsteaders, a film by Shaena Mallett
reviewed by Alissa Boochever

The Uncertainty Mindset: Innovation Insights from the Frontiers of Food, by Vaughn Tan
reviewed by John Broadway

Tasting Difference: Food, Race, and Cultural Encounters in Early Modern Literature, by Gitanjali G. Shahani
reviewed by Sakshi Dogra

Right to Harm, a film by Matt Wechsler and Annie Speicher
reviewed by Allison Gray

Epistenology: Wine as Experience, by Nicola Perullo
reviewed by Anthony Palmiscno

Craft: An Argument, by Pete Brown
reviewed by Katie Schwind

FoodWISE: A Whole Systems Guide to Sustainable and Delicious Food Choices, by Gigi Berardi
reviewed by Sarra Talib

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.3: Aya H. Kimura

For our sixth season of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our third issue of 2021, edited by Krishnendu Ray, and featuring articles and creative pieces which collectively address the issue of “gastropolitics,” as described in that issue’s editorial letter.

In this episode Editorial Co-Chair Daniel Bender is joined by Associate Professor Kimura to discuss her recently published article, “Tsukemono (Japanese pickles) and Their Traditional Vegetables,” which offers a fascinating insight into the history and practices of Japanese pickles, as well as the effect of modern agriculture and chemical additives on a revered tradition of fermentation.

Suguki barrels at Kamigamo Shrine
(Image courtesy of Aya H. Kimura)

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.3: Benjamin Schrager

For our sixth season of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our third issue of 2021, edited by Krishnendu Ray, and featuring articles and creative pieces which collectively address the issue of “gastropolitics,” as described in that issue’s editorial letter.

In this episode, Editorial Collective member James Farrer is joined by the author of “Risky but Raw: On (Not) Regulating One of the Most High-Risk Dishes in Japan,” to discuss the ‘underlying social and ecological forces that shape situated expressions of risk’ in the context of increasingly popular raw chicken dishes in Japan.