Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.2: Eric Funabashi

For our fifth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our recently published second issue of 2021, featuring articles on topics including commensality and creative collaboration, the politics of food systems, and race and representation.

In this episode, Editorial Collective member Bob Valgenti welcomes Eric Funabashi to discuss culinary experiences in Brazil following the initial migration of Japanese workers to São Paulo’s coffee farms in 1908 (as he explores in his recently published article, “Japanese Immigrants’ Pantry: Creating Eating Habits and Identities with Brazilian Ingredients”). Drawing on published cookbooks and immigrants’ private diaries, Funabashi shows how Japanese immigrants forged new culinary practices and identities in Brazil over the course of the 20th century.

Podcast Dispatches from Vol. 21: What To Read Now with Kim Walker and Mark Nesbitt

For our fifth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our recently published second issue of 2021, featuring articles on topics including commensality and creative collaboration, the politics of food systems, and race and representation.

For this episode, our Reviews Editor Jaclyn Rohel and her Culinaria research colleague Janita Van Dyk introduce a new feature on recent and upcoming books in Food Studies, “What to Read Now.” This week Jackie and Janita are joined by Kim Walker and Mark Nesbitt, authors of Just the Tonic: A Natural History of Tonic Water (Kew Publishing, 2019; reviewed in Issue 21.1), to explore cinchona-infused sparkling water in the history of medicine, in cocktail cultures, and in the archives.

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.2: Alison Hope Alkon & Rafi Grosglik

For our fifth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our recently published second issue of 2021, featuring articles on topics including commensality and creative collaboration, the politics of food systems, and race and representation.

For this episode, Editorial Collective member Krishnendu Ray welcomes co-authors of “Eating (with) the Other: Race in American Food Television Alison Hope Alkon and Rafi Grosglik to discuss representations of race in North American food media. Drawing on examples from contemporary popular culture (specifically Marcus Samuelsson and the late Anthony Bourdain), they explore how the medium of television engages with racial inequalities and how it could act as a critical intervention for social change.

Alison Hope Alkon
Rafi Grosglik

Summer 2021, Volume 21 Number 2

Editorial Letter | Paula J. Johnson

PORTRAYING THE “OTHER”
Eating (with) the Other: Race in American Food Television | Alison Hope Alkon and Rafi Grosglik

Anti-Black Racism in Food Advertising: Rogers’ Golden Syrup and the Imagery of White Supremacy in the Canadian West | Donica Belisle

Roundtable: The Great Italics Debate | The Gastronomica Editorial Collective

THE POLITICS OF SCALE
Chicken Politics: Agrifood Capitalism, Anxious Bodies, and the New Meanings of Chicken Meat in India | Michaël Bruckert

Household and Community Gardens Surge in the Philippines and Senegal during COVID-19: How Do Contrasting Models Speak to Different Visions for Future Food Systems? | Halie Kampman, Shun-Nan Chiang, and Salam Sawadogo

IMAGINATIONS AND IDENTITIES
Japanese Immigrants’ Pantry: Creating Eating Habits and Identities with Brazilian Ingredients | Eric Funabashi

The Bittersweet Potato in the Taiwanese Imagination | Shang-Huei Liang

Kitchenlessness, or The Migrant’s Affair with Food | Gema Charmaine Gonzales

PLACE, KNOWLEDGE, AND CUISINE
Digesting Peru in Brooklyn: The Flavor of Culinary Nationalism | Amy Cox Hall

Well Rooted: An Interview with Chef Rob Connoley | Daniel E. Bender

When the Rainbows Bring the Crawfish | V. Constanza Ocampo-Raeder

FEEDING THE SOUL
Before Everything Else | Anne Finger

Meditations on Entropy in the Kitchen | Sam Browett

Love, Math, and Brunello di Montalcino | Maria Finn

REVIEWS
Sugarcane and Rum: The Bittersweet History of Labor and Life on the Yucatán Peninsula, by John R. Gust and Jennifer P. Mathews
Reviewed by Valeria Mantilla Morales

Feeding the Crisis: Care and Abandonment in America’s Food Safety Net, by Maggie Dickinson
Reviewed by Merin Oleschuk

Women Who Dig: Farming, Feminism, and the Fight to Feed the World, by Trina Moyles, photographs by KJ Dakin
Reviewed by Claire Perttula

Food Fights: How History Matters to Contemporary Food Debates, edited by Charles C. Ludington and Matthew M. Booker
Reviewed by Signe Rousseau

Of Morsels and Marvels by Maryse Condé, edited by Charles C. Ludington and Matthew M. Booker, translated by Richard Philcox
Reviewed by Jacqueline Sarro

Once Was Water, a film by Christopher Beaver and Diana Fuller
Reviewed by Christy Spackman

Politics of Food, edited by Aaron Cezar and Dani Burrows
Reviewed by Pamela Tudge

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.2: Rob Connoley

For our fifth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our upcoming second issue of 2021, featuring articles on topics including commensality and creative collaboration, the politics of food systems, and race and representation.

For this inaugural episode of our Summer 2021 season, Editorial Collective member Daniel Bender welcomes chef Rob Connoley to discuss culinary collaboration and the roots of Ozark cuisine at his research-driven restaurant, Bulrush. Drawing on his experiences of shared knowledge creation with a range of local academic and culture partners, Connoley helps bring place-based storytelling to the forefront of culinary creation.