Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.2: Alison Hope Alkon & Rafi Grosglik

For our fifth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our recently published second issue of 2021, featuring articles on topics including commensality and creative collaboration, the politics of food systems, and race and representation.

For this episode, Editorial Collective member Krishnendu Ray welcomes co-authors of “Eating (with) the Other: Race in American Food Television Alison Hope Alkon and Rafi Grosglik to discuss representations of race in North American food media. Drawing on examples from contemporary popular culture (specifically Marcus Samuelsson and the late Anthony Bourdain), they explore how the medium of television engages with racial inequalities and how it could act as a critical intervention for social change.

Alison Hope Alkon
Rafi Grosglik

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.2: Rob Connoley

For our fifth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our upcoming second issue of 2021, featuring articles on topics including commensality and creative collaboration, the politics of food systems, and race and representation.

For this inaugural episode of our Summer 2021 season, Editorial Collective member Daniel Bender welcomes chef Rob Connoley to discuss culinary collaboration and the roots of Ozark cuisine at his research-driven restaurant, Bulrush. Drawing on his experiences of shared knowledge creation with a range of local academic and culture partners, Connoley helps bring place-based storytelling to the forefront of culinary creation.

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.1: Amy Bentley

For our fourth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our upcoming first issue of 2021, which continues to feature COVID-19 Dispatches, but also original research articles around the themes of the relationship between food, power and politics, cultivating relationships, and sustaining memories.

For this last episode of our current season, historian Amy Bentley returns to the show to discuss the politics of food and nutrition with Editorial Collective member Melissa Fuster. She traces how the Reagan administration 40 years ago shifted (deliberately or inadvertently) the classification of ketchup from a condiment to a vegetable in an effort to overhaul national school lunch programs and cut government costs, a move that disproportionately affected the health of lower-income children.

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.1: Alexis Agliano Sanborn

For our fourth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our upcoming first issue of 2021, which continues to feature COVID-19 Dispatches, but also original research articles around the themes of the relationship between food, power and politics, cultivating relationships, and sustaining memories.

Join Editorial Collective member (and our extremely valued Managing Editor) Jessica Carbone in conversation with Alexis Agliano Sanborn about her upcoming article on how Japan’s school lunch programs connected people and supported communities in the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Highlighting civil-society initiatives, Sanborn discusses how school lunch programs were – and continue to be – a source of resiliency in local food supply and distribution networks.

Podcast Dispatches from Issue 21.1: Michelle T. King and Wendy Jia-Chen Fu

For our fourth series of podcasts produced in collaboration with Meant to Be Eaten on Heritage Radio Network, we sit down (virtually) with authors who have contributed to our upcoming first issue of 2021, which continues to feature COVID-19 Dispatches, but also original research articles around the themes of the relationship between food, power and politics, cultivating relationships, and sustaining memories.

This episode features historians Michelle T. King and Wendy Jia-Chen Fu in discussion with Editorial Collective member Krishnendu Ray about their upcoming article on the stigmatization of Chinese food and eating habits in Anglophone media coverage of the coronavirus pandemic. They weigh in on common questions surrounding wet markets and the wildlife trade in Chinese food systems, dispel misinformation, and share ways to both combat negative stereotypes about Chinese food and support Chinese American communities in the United States.

Michelle King
Jia-Chen Fu