Food in the time of COVID-19: Call for Submissions

Lockdowns, social distancing, quarantines, and simple fear in a time of uncertainty highlight the challenges of provisioning, the experiences of food workers, and the essential services food shops, hawkers, street vendors, bars, restaurants, markets, farms, and many more play in providing not only sustenance but also the liveliness upon which we depend in daily life.  

The Gastronomica Editorial Collective is seeking dispatches about food in the time of COVID-19. We seek as many diverse voices as possible, from as many affected, infected places as possible to provide a snapshot in time. We know that even as this next issue will go to press, the situation in many places may have worsened (but, hopefully, improved). We are, though, already immersed in stories and narratives of resilience that deserve to be remembered and documented. We seek, therefore, reflections in resilience. How do people feed themselves in times of crisis? What is the role of community and social ties in feeding ourselves, families, the ill, and each other? How has the crisis both highlighted the essential services provided by food workers and the precarity of those services? 

We invite shorter pieces (100-1000 words) in the form of personal dispatches drawn from lived experience: portraits, creative non-fiction, telephonic/digital interviews, photographs and other images, and more. If you are, or you know, someone who would like their voice heard, but might not have the time to put words to paper, please be in touch and we can arrange a conversation or interview with a collective member. We are eager to read, listen, and share. 

 Submissions can be sent directly to gastrome@ucpress.edu with the subject line “Food & Covid,” followed by your name and submission title. Please include a brief cover letter that can function as both an abstract and author bio, and include a word count. (If you have any citations, they should follow our general submission guidelines at https://gcfs.ucpress.edu/content/submit.) Please include (in-text) the date, place, and if possible, time, of writing in all submissions. 

In an effort to document, recall, and portray particular moments in the coming months, we are offering rolling submission deadlines. 

First submissions by: 10 April 

Second submissions by: 25 April

(We anticipate running more dispatches in forthcoming issues.)

(Empty shelves in a usually well-stocked supermarket in Cape Town, South Africa)

Introducing our new Acquisitions team

Are you a food studies student or scholar looking to get published, but you don’t know where to start?

Gastronomica is proactively seeking to increase the representation of early career scholars and authors from under-represented backgrounds, encompassing ethnic, gender, and abilities diversity. We are also seeking scholarship that addresses food experiences from the Global South and marginalized, underrepresented communities.

As one of only few journals managed through an editorial collective, Gastronomica has created an Acquisitions Cluster within the larger collective that aims to expand Gastronomica’s ability to showcase the broadest possible spectrum of ideas and voices, bridge the divide between academic scholarship and public engagement, and appeal to a diverse readership. 

The Gastronomica Acquisitions Cluster seeks to address existing structural inequities in academic journals, which disproportionately affect women, scholars from marginalized, “minority” backgrounds, and those from the Global South who work in institutions outside North America and Europe. We engage authors at conferences and food-related events, and through direct communications. We also work with authors by providing constructive feedback before submission and through the review process (as needed). By doing so, we aim at strengthening Gastronomica’s place in the publishing landscape as a stimulating, accessible publication with fresh ideas, unusual perspectives, original formats, exceptional writing, a diverse authorship, and a fair and respectful review process.

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The Race against Rot: Gastronomica’s New Editorial Team Weighs In on Saving Food

Compiled and edited by Anelyse M. Weiler, Sarah Elton, and Josée Johnston.

Gastronomica’s incoming editorial team gathered in Toronto this past fall to discuss the future of food studies and pressing issues for food scholars today. The new team explored the theme of “saving food” as part of a public roundtable hosted by the University of Toronto’s Culinaria Research Centre. What questions should researchers and food studies practitioners be prioritizing to address the issue of saving food? What are some of the creative new ways of exploring the field? What needs saving, who ought to do it, and what should be left to molder away? To hear what Gastronomica’s new editorial team thinks about these issues in food studies, we asked (some of) them to weigh in on four questions, including a fun glimpse into how they “save” food in their own kitchens.

  • Simone Cinotto (Associate Professor of Modern History at the University of Gastronomic
    Sciences)
  • Paula Johnson (Curator at Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History)
  • Eric C. Rath (Professor of History at the University of Kansas)
  • Krishnendu Ray (Associate Professor and Chair of Nutrition and Food Studies at New
    York University)
  • Signe Rousseau (Lecturer in Critical Literacy and Professional Communication at the University of Cape Town)
  • Amy Trubek (Professor in Nutrition and Food Sciences at the University of Vermont)
  • Robert Valgenti (Professor and Chair of Philosophy at Lebanon Valley College)
  • Helen Zoe Veit (Associate Professor of History at Michigan State University)

What does food need to be saved from?

Johnson: Imagine a world without field plows and fishing boats, cauldrons and cooking tools, family recipes and restaurant menus, culinary correspondence and kitchen stories from places and people in the past. That world, bereft of the historical material culture of food, would be a dismal and oblivious place without tangible connections to the ideas, innovations, and understandings about food, in the broadest sense, from those who came before us. Curators, librarians, and archivists are savers. Through collecting, preserving, and providing public access to rich materials, we help researchers discover treasure troves of data
about who we are, where we’ve been, and what has mattered over time. Our collections continue to reveal new insights on diverse aspects of food history—cultural, social, political, environmental, technological. They provide evidence of people and places that might otherwise be forgotten. And because they are saved for perpetuity, we can only imagine how new
technologies, such as the experimental (emerging?) field of proteomics, might uncover new layers of insight through the analysis of proteins left on the literal pages of history.

Rath: Not all historians recognize the importance of food, though! Food needs to be saved from its perceived banality. It’s not just consumers who take food for granted by expecting seventy brands of breakfast cereal in the supermarket and watermelon in the winter. For far too long historians, particularly in my field of Japanese history, have simply ignored food unless it is relevant to crises such as famine or war. Yet, food is always central to daily life and it needs to be made central to history in the same way that gender, race, or class cannot be ignored.

Rousseau: On the other hand, food needs to be saved from being fetishized, and wasted.

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Fall 2017, Volume 17 Number 3

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Fall 2017, Volume 17 Number 3

FROM THE EDITOR
Editor’s Letter | Melissa L. Caldwell

CULINARY GLOBALIZATION AND HERITAGE POLITICS: CHINA, JAPAN, AND SOUTH KOREA
Global Engagement for Local and Indigenous Tastes: Culinary Globalization
in East Asia | Stephanie Assmann

Let Them Eat Royal Court Cuisine! Heritage Politics of Defining Global Hansik | Chi-Hoon Kim

Culinary Politics in Japan: The Shokuiku Campaign | Stephanie Assmann

The Cultural Politics of Food: Rice as an Anti-Globalization
Project | Ding-Tzann Lii

Kyoto Cuisine Gone Global | Greg de St. Maurice

Beyond Merroir: The Okinawan Taste for Clams | C. Anne Claus

The Transformation of Pig Feasts in Rural Northeast China |
Ann Veeck, Hongyan Yu, and Gregory Veeck

China’s Emerging Food Media: Promoting Culinary Heritage in the
Global Age | Lanlan Kuang

Historical Reflections on Culinary Globalization in East Asia | Eric C. Rath

CREATIVE REFLECTIONS
Cooking for Democracy | Joseph Heathcott

Griswold No. 10. | Andrew Furman

REVIEW ESSAY
Food Culture at the Margins of Consumption: Two New Books on Eating
Disorders | Emily J.H. Contois

REVIEWS
Food Consumption in Global Perspective: Essays in the Anthropology of Food in
Honour of Jack Goody
Edited by Jakob A. Klein and Anne Murcott, Reviewed by Jesse Dart

Just Food: Philosophy, Justice and Food
Edited by J.M. Dieterle, Reviewed by Pascale Joassart-Marcelli

Empire of Tea: The Asian Leaf that Conquered the World
By Markman Ellis, Richard Coulton, and Matthew Mauger, Reviewed by
Lawrence Zhang

The Brewer’s Tale: A History of the World According to Beer
By William Bostwick, Reviwed by Aaron Ellis

Tasting French Terroir: The History of an Idea
By Thomas Parker, Reviewed by Cristina Adele Solazzo

BOOKS AND FILMS RECEIVED